How to Cut a Chain Link Fence the Easy Way

How to Cut a Chain Link Fence the Easy Way

If you’ve been thinking about installing a new chain link fence anytime soon, it’s essential to know how to cut the fence to size.

Feeling hesitant to go through with the process on your own isn’t something new. A lot of people do. But it’s not a very justified feeling because the actual job isn’t that hard to accomplish. This is due to several things, one of them being that there is no necessity for making any real cuts.

Given the necessary tools and the needed knowledge, you’ll be able to unweave any part of the fence to adjust it as you wish in no time.

But, obviously, using a bolt cutter or heavy-duty wire cutter is still a valid way of getting the job done. So we’ll talk about it shortly below.

Here’s What You Will Need

All you’ll need are a few common hand tools. Having everything you need at your disposal makes the job feel less intimidating.

Here’s the list:

First Step: Take the Necessary Measurements

Similarly to the usual DIY projects that you’d do at home, this process will require you to do some prepping up first.

The most crucial part of the preparation is taking measurements. The level of accuracy here doesn’t have to match that of a woodworking project. But still, marking your spots is very helpful.

Take the measures of the area I which the fence will be put and transfer what you come up with to the actual fence material.

Second Step: Fence Stretcher and Tension Bar

The goal behind using a tension bar is to make sure that the tension is evenly distributed throughout the fence.

This needs to be installed before you try to make the cuts. It can also be used to take out the end part of the fencing.

These end parts are also called fence stretchers. The purpose behind them is to allow the tension bar to hold the tension once the fence is put in its place.

If you need to get to the fencing material, all you have to do is take out the fence stretcher.

Third Step: The Unweaving

The unweaving process will require you to use the lineman’s pliers.
Even though this step isn’t in any way ambiguous, it still feels very tedious and time-consuming.

Twist the bottom and top weaves and keep at it until you’re able to break one the chain link fence pieces free.

Once that’s all done, the fence stretcher can then be installed once again as you near finishing the fence installation.

While many may be inclined to throw away the removed fence parts, we recommend that you keep them and store them somewhere just in case you might find some use for them in the future.

So, Are There Any Actual Cuts to Be Done?

In some cases, unweaving the fence isn’t exactly sufficient.

If you find yourself required to make a cut, you should rely on bolt cutters for the best results. A hacksaw can also get the job done, but what the bolt cutter offer in terms of simplicity and affordability is unparalleled. It’s also a very easy tool to find for most DIY enthusiasts.

How’re they used? Well, all you have to do is take the usual measurements and go through it wire by wire.

If you also need to cut through the tension bar, you can do so with bolt cutters.

Cutting Through the Chain Link Fence Post

Sometimes, you’ll also find yourself obligated to cut through the chain link fence post.
Again, everything starts with the measurements. Make them accurately and transfer them to each post. To make the cuts, you’ll need either a reciprocating saw or a hacksaw.

But in any case, you need to make sure that the blade you’re using is designed to cut through metal.

If you’d ask me, I’d recommend a reciprocating saw for a quicker and a smoother cut.
Mind the possible wobbling that can occur to the fence posts as you try to make your cuts.

To prevent this, you might need to get some heavy duty clamps to hold the posts down on your workbench. Or get someone to help you out by holding it down for you.

Final Thoughts

Coming to this job inexperienced can undoubtedly cause hesitation. But with the available knowledge in this article, and after gathering the necessary equipment, all the doubt should be a thing of the past. So, what are you waiting for? You have a fence to take care of!

PS: if you want to take your skills to the next level, check our buying guides and reviews, where we cover everything you may ever need in your tool box, be it a Tile Saw, Chainsaw Under 200, Cordless Circular Saw, Circular Saw Blade, Random Orbital Sander, Sliding Compound Miter Saw, Chainsaw Mill, Cordless Tool Set, Table Saw, bucks, or even Chainsaw Chaps. We also like to compare power tool brands, such as DeWalt and Milwaukee.

References:

  • https://www.hunker.com/12001474/how-to-cut-a-chain-link-fence
  • https://www.bladeforums.com/threads/what-tool-is-best-for-cutting-chain-link-fence.131484/
  • https://www.wikihow.com/Remove-a-Chain-Link-Fence
  • Our own experience